Green Global Venture

Wind Power...How it works ?

Air flow through wind turbines or sails can produce significant mechanical power. Windmills are used for their mechanical power, wind pumps for water pumping and sails to propel ships, but the most frequent current use is to turn a generator for electrical power. Wind power, as an alternative to burning fossil fuels, is plentiful, renewable, widely distributed, clean, produces no greenhouse gas emissions during operation, and uses little land. The net effects on the environment are far less problematic than those of nonrenewable power sources.

 

 

What about Wind Farms...?


Wind farms consist of many individual wind turbines which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electricity, competitive with or in many places cheaper than coal or gas plants. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land, and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are considerably higher. Small onshore wind farms can feed some energy into the grid or provide electricity to isolated off-grid locations.

 

 

Potential of Wind Power Plants...


Worldwide there are now over two hundred thousand wind turbines operating, with a total nameplate capacity of 282,482 MW as of end 2012. The European Union alone passed some 100,000 MW nameplate capacity in September 2012, while the United States surpassed 50,000 MW in August 2012 and China's grid connected capacity passed 50,000 MW the same month.

 

Wind power capacity has expanded rapidly to 336 GW in June 2014, and wind energy production was around 4% of total worldwide electricity usage, and growing rapidly. The actual amount of electricity that wind is able to generate is calculated by multiplying the nameplate capacity by the capacity factor, which varies according to equipment and location. Estimates of the capacity factors for wind installations are in the range of 35% to 44%.

Europe accounted for 48% of the world total wind power generation capacity in 2009. In 2010, Spain became Europe's leading producer of wind energy; achieving 42,976 GWh. Germany held the top spot in Europe in terms of installed capacity, with a total of 27,215 MW as of 31 December 2010.

Our Power Plant & Projects

Our projects consists of wind power plant from 1 up to 30 MWe.

Our projects are Wind Farms and Offshore development.

 

Our Projects capacities are calculated thanks to our Engineering Department, depending on various factor such mostly related to data collected by national environmental agencies on each of our locations.

Wind Power Sustainability...

Many of our most common forms of energy create significant pollution in their extraction (coal mines and oil spills), use (greenhouse gases and toxins) and disposal (nuclear waste and slag heaps). Wind power does not have these problems, nor does hydroelectric power. The energy and materials cost of a wind turbine is recovered after about six months of operation and emissions during operation are environmentally neutral except for a limited local impact. When a wind turbine has been used up, after about 20 years, all components are recovered for recycling and all that remains on the site is a harmless concrete foundation.

Technical Points about Wind Power...

Wind power is very consistent from year to year but has significant variation over shorter time scales. It is therefore used in conjunction with other electric power sources to give a reliable supply. As the proportion of windpower in a region increases, a need to upgrade the grid, and a lowered ability to supplant conventional production can occur. Power management techniques such as having excess capacity, geographically distributed turbines, dispatchable backing sources, sufficient hydroelectric power, exporting and importing power to neighboring areas, using vehicle-to-grid strategies or reducing demand when wind production is low, can in many cases overcome these problems. In addition, weather forecasting permits the electricity network to be readied for the predictable variations in production that occur.

 

Wind energy is the kinetic energy of air in motion, also called wind. Total wind energy flowing through an imaginary surface with area during the time t is:

 

 

where ρ is the density of air; v is the wind speed; Avt is the volume of air passing through A (which is considered perpendicular to the direction of the wind); Avtρ is therefore the mass m passing through "A". Note that ½ ρv2 is the kinetic energy of the moving air per unit volume.

Power is energy per unit time, so the wind power incident on A (e.g. equal to the rotor area of a wind turbine) is:

 

 

Wind power in an open air stream is thus proportional to the third power of the wind speed; the available power increases eightfold when the wind speed doubles. Wind turbines for grid electricity therefore need to be especially efficient at greater wind speeds.